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Fun Fact January 30, 2020

30 January 2020


Been to the movies lately?  Before the main feature that you came to see runs, you’ll typically be treated to coming attractions, better knows as a movie trailer.  But why is it called a trailer?  Movie trailers originated over a hundred years ago, in a chain of theaters owned by Marcus Loew, the co-founder of the film studio MGM. Loew hired Nils Granlund as the advertising manager of the chain, who created the first movie trailer in 1912. Oddly enough, the trailer was not for a film, but for an upcoming Broadway musical. Granlund edited together film footage of the show’s rehearsals, and screened them after the feature film. The producers of film serials borrowed this idea and made mini movies, which contained a brief trailer to hint at the events of the next installment.  By the 1930s, theaters became concerned that audiences would leave after a film rather than sit through advertisements.  That’s right, before the days of post-credit scenes, bloopers and deleted scenes, people actually left once the movie was over. In order to force the audience to watch the trailers, theaters began showing them before the movie had started. However, people were already used to calling them trailers, and the name stuck.


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