Local election results across the region from last night 11/2

According to the Virginia Department of Elections (VDE) Website these are the unofficial results from last night’s Nov. 2 election in Virginia.

The results are incomplete as absentee ballots are accepted through midnight Nov. 5.

Certification of election results are expect by Nov.15 after all ballots are counted.

Republican Glenn Youngkin has been declared the winner in the Virginia’s race for governor.

Republican Winsome Sears is declared the state’s new Lieutenant Governor.

Republican Jason Miyares has been declared the State’s Attorney General.

Virginia House of Delegates declared unofficial winners include William Wiley, Nicholas Clemente, Dave LaRock, Todd Gilbert and Michael Webert.

Clarke County elections results according to VDE are.

Zachary Hudson receiving the most votes for Mayor of Boyce last night.

Carol Caffelt for the Boyce Town Council receiving the majority of votes as of last night.

Whitney Maddox received the most votes for the Boyce’s Recorder so far.

In Frederick County.

Blaine Dunn, Josh Ludwig and Judith McCann-Slaughter are projected winners to their respective district as Board of Supervisor members.

School Board members receiving the most votes as of last night include Tim Stowe, Miles Adkins and Diana Hackney in their respective districts.

The rest ran unopposed.

Page County elections reported by the VDE.

Megan Gordon received the most votes so far for the Chair of the School Board.

The rest of the candidates ran unopposed.

Shenandoah County results from the VDE are.

Joshua Stephens, Karl Roulston and Dennis Morris projected winners of their respective districts as Supervisors.

Dennis Barlow, Kyle Gutshell and William French Jr. are projected winners for School Board seats.

The other candidates ran unopposed.

Warren County results according to the VDE.

Those running for Board of Supervisors positions receiving the most votes as of last night are Vicky Cook and Jerome Butler in their respective districts.

School Board candidates receiving the most votes are Antoinette Funk, Melanie Salin in their districts so far.

Amber Morris received the most votes for Front Royal Town Council according to the VDE as of last night.

Winchester City votes according to the VDE from last night are.

Jorge Gonzalez receiving the most votes for City Council as of last night.

The rest of the candidates ran unopposed.

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Early in person voting begins tomorrow 9/17 in Virginia

Early in person voting begins tomorrow Sept. 17 in Virginia for the November 2 elections.

Voters can fill out their ballots at voter registration locations tomorrow Sept. 17 through Oct. 30.

Since the General Assembly passed legislation last year no reason is needed to vote early in Virginia.

Among state offices to be decided in the Nov. 2 election Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, and House of Delegate members.

With other local offices to be decided on election day as well.

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Herring, Ayala win Democratic down-ballot races in Virginia

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By Associated Press | Published Jun. 10, 2021 6:40 a.m.

By MATTHEW BARAKAT and SARAH RANKIN

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring fended off a strong primary challenge, while Del. Hala Ayala emerged from a field of six candidates to win the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor in Tuesday’s primary election.

Herring and Ayala will join gubernatorial nominee Terry McAuliffe at the top of the Democratic ticket in November as the party seeks to extend a 12-year winning streak in statewide races.

Herring defeated Norfolk Del. Jay Jones in the attorney general primary, even though Jones was backed by Gov. Ralph Northam.

Northam’s endorsed candidate fared better in the lieutenant governor race, though. Ayala was the favorite of establishment Democrats, including Northam and House Speaker Eileen Filler-Corn, and defeated Del. Sam Rasoul, who was favored by the Democratic left.

Virginia’s off-year elections typically draw national attention as a possible bellwether for trends heading into next year’s midterms.

Republicans chose their statewide candidates in a nominating convention last month. The GOP hasn’t won a statewide race in Virginia since 2009.

ATTORNEY GENERAL

Herring won the Democratic nomination in the race for attorney general Tuesday, fending off a challenge from a state lawmaker who sought to cast Herring as insufficiently progressive.

Herring, who is seeking a third term, will face Republican state Del. Jason Miyares in the November general election.

“After eight years of unprecedented progress, we’ll have the opportunity with a Democratic majority to break progressive ground like never before,” Herring said on Twitter after he was declared the winner.

Jones conceded and tweeted that he’ll work to elect Herring and the entire Democratic ticket.

Herring is a former state senator who became attorney general in 2014 and was reelected easily in 2017. He pitched himself to voters as a progressive champion on abortion rights, gun control and immigrant-friendly policies and argued that his experience made him the best choice to keep the office in Democratic control.

Herring has touted his record battling former President Donald Trump’s policies in court, his work to eliminate Virginia’s backlog of untested rape kits, his defense of marriage equality, and his efforts to hold manufacturers accountable for their role in the opioid crisis.

Jones, a Black 32-year-old two-term delegate, argued it was time for change and sought to cast Herring as slow to respond to the reckoning sparked by the police killing of George Floyd last summer.

He repeatedly criticized Herring, who is white, for creating an animal rights unit before an office of civil rights. Jones said that as attorney general he would use the office to more aggressively investigate police shootings.

Another issue in the sometimes-contentious race was Herring’s acknowledgement in 2019 that he had worn blackface in college.

During a debate, Jones attacked Herring not for having worn blackface but for what he described as an insincere apology at the time to the legislative Black caucus.

Jones picked up Northam’s endorsement in a move seen as a significant snub of Herring. He also had the backing of former Attorney General Mary Sue Terry, the first and only woman ever elected to statewide office in Virginia, and U.S. Rep. Elaine Luria.

Many other establishment Democratic figures, including two of the state’s most powerful Black lawmakers, had endorsed Herring.

Miyares issued a statement after Herring’s victory calling the attorney general too liberal.

“Under Mark Herring’s leadership, the Attorney General’s office has become radically liberal and more dangerous,” Miyares said.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

Del. Hala Ayala, who launched her political career in 2017 in response to the election of Donald Trump, won the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor, boosted by the endorsement of Gov. Ralph Northam.

Ayala was the favorite of the Democratic establishment, and had the endorsement of House Speaker Eileen Filler-Corn as well as Northam. She defeated Roanoke Del. Sam Rasoul, who had been a slight favorite and the preferred candidate of the party’s progressive wing.

Ayala represents parts of Prince William County and claims Afro-Latina, Irish and Lebanese heritage. Her nomination also practically ensures that Virginia will elect its first female lieutenant governor — her Republican opponent is Winsome Sears, the first Black woman to receive a major party’s endorsement for statewide office.

In a statement issued after her victory, Ayala emphasized her personal story, as she did throughout her campaign, including her father’s death to gun violence and a harrowing pregnancy where she relied on Medicaid for health care.

“I understand the struggles so many Virginia families face because I’ve lived them,” she said.

Ayala ran for delegate after helping organize the Women’s March on Washington after Trump’s election in 2016. She went on to defeat a four-term incumbent, Richard Anderson, who now chairs the Republican Party of Virginia.

Late in the campaign, Ayala accepted $100,000 from Dominion Energy’s political action committee, despite a pledge to environmental group Clean Virginia — which itself had donated $25,000 to Ayala’s campaign — that she wouldn’t do so.

Sears quickly jumped on the issue, criticizing Ayala Tuesday night after her victory for taking Dominion’s money.

“Delegate Ayala has proven that Virginians cannot trust her, that her pocket is prime for lining, and that her loyalty can be bought,” Sears said in a written statement.

The lieutenant governor presides over the state Senate and can break tie votes in a chamber that is narrowly controlled by Democrats. The post has often served as a launching pad for gubernatorial bids.

___

Barakat reported from Falls Church.

(All contents © copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved)

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McAuliffe win sets up Virginia clash with outsider Youngkin

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By Associated Press | Published Jun. 9, 2021 7:15 a.m.

By SARAH RANKIN

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Terry McAuliffe, a longtime fixture of Democratic politics, handily won his party’s nomination for Virginia governor in his quest for a second term, setting up what’s expected to be a hotly contested general election against a wealthy businessman and political newcomer, GOP nominee Glenn Youngkin.

In his victory speech Tuesday night, McAuliffe made the case that Youngkin is too conservative for a state that’s long been trending blue.

“Let me be crystal clear: Glenn Youngkin is not a reasonable Republican,” said McAuliffe, who defeated four challengers to win the primary.

Youngkin shot back, describing Virginia as a state that over the past two Democratic governorships has gotten less safe, more expensive and has not offered enough economic opportunities.

“We need a new kind of leader to bring a new day to Virginia,” Youngkin said in a statement. “Get ready, because Terry McAuliffe will default to the same political games he’s played his entire life.”

A longtime Democratic Party fundraiser and a close friend of Bill and Hillary Clinton, McAuliffe held office from 2014 to 2018. Like all Virginia governors, he was prohibited from seeking a consecutive term. He jumped into the race in December after deciding in 2019 against a run for president.

Virginia is the only state in the nation with an open race for governor this year, and the contest is expected to draw outsized national attention as a barometer of voter sentiment in each party heading into the midterm elections.

The race has also taken on heightened importance as a referendum on the sweeping changes Virginia Democrats have implemented since assuming full control of the state government in 2020. They have pushed through gun control and police reform, marijuana legalization and a higher minimum wage, transforming what was once a reliably red state.

“We are a different state than we were eight years ago, and we are not going back,” McAuliffe said in his speech.

McAuliffe, 64, focused his campaign on the need for bold action to address Virginia’s lagging teacher pay and inequities in education funding. He’s also pledged to work to accelerate Virginia’s minimum wage increase to $15 by 2024, protect abortion access, and ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.

He earned the endorsement of Gov. Ralph Northam, who said McAuliffe was best suited to lead Virginia’s economic recovery from the pandemic and cement the transformational changes Democrats have implemented.

McAuliffe also raised far more money than the other candidates: state Sen. Jennifer McClellan, former Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax and Del. Lee Carter. From the jump, he had the backing of a substantial number of elected officials across the commonwealth, including many powerful Black lawmakers.

“I liked what he’s done and believe he can do what he’s promised. And I think he can win,” said Joe Glaze, a 70-year-old retired clergy member who voted for McAuliffe Tuesday afternoon in Richmond. “That’s the main thing: I want someone who will win and beat Youngkin.”

Some more progressive voters criticized McAuliffe’s record on energy and criminal justice issues, and saw him as standing in the way of Carroll Foy and McClellan, who were each trying to become the nation’s first Black woman governor.

Either also would have been Virginia’s first female governor. The commonwealth has elected only one woman in its history to a statewide position and never to its highest office.

Both issued statements congratulating McAuliffe Tuesday night.

“Let’s get in the trenches. Let’s do the work because at the end of the day, we must win in November,” Carroll Foy said.

Del. Hala Ayala won the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor Tuesday, all but ensuring that Virginia will soon elect its first female lieutenant governor — her Republican opponent is Winsome Sears, the first Black woman to receive a major party’s endorsement for statewide office.

Democratic Attorney General Mark Herring meanwhile secured his party’s nomination for a third term, staving off a strong challenge from Del. Jay Jones, who sought to cast Herring as insufficiently progressive. Herring will face Republican state Del. Jason Miyares in November.

Republicans picked their nominees for this year’s statewide races in a multisite convention process in May. Youngkin, a former executive at an investment fund with no voting record to be scrutinized, has pledged to use his personal wealth to power his campaign.

Bobbi Andrews, 85, said she voted for McAuliffe based on his past record as governor and, in part, because of his stance on education. But she said she’s voted for Republicans before and considers Youngkin a strong candidate.

“I’m glad to see a strong Republican running because we need two parties,” Andrews said. “If we don’t have two parties, neither one of them will be honest.”

___

Associated Press writer Ben Finley contributed to this report from Norfolk and Virginia Beach.

(All contents © copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved)

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A guide to down ballot races in Virginia’s primary election

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By Associated Press | Published June 8, 2021 12:35 p.m.

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — While the Democratic race for governor has attracted the most attention, voters are also choosing Democratic nominees for other statewide offices in Tuesday’s primary election.

Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking a third term, but faces a strong challenge from Norfolk Del. Jay Jones. And six candidates are seeking the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor.

Both Democrats and Republicans are holding nominating primaries for some House of Delegates seats and local races.

Virginia’s off-year elections typically draw national attention as a possible bellwether for trends heading into next year’s midterms.

Republicans chose their statewide candidates in a nominating convention last month. The GOP is looking to end a 12-year losing streak in statewide elections.

Early voting has been underway since late April. Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Virginia’s voter ID law was repealed last year, so people casting a ballot can sign an ID confirmation statement instead of providing ID.

ATTORNEY GENERAL

Incumbent Mark Herring is seeking a third term, looking to fend off a challenge from Del. Jay Jones, who represents Norfolk.

A former state senator who became attorney general in 2014 and was reelected easily in 2017, Herring has pitched himself to voters as a progressive champion on abortion rights, gun control and immigrant-friendly policies and argued that his experience made him the best choice to keep the office in Democratic control.

Jones, a Black 32-year-old two-term delegate, has argued the office needs a fresh perspective and sought to cast Herring as slow to respond to the reckoning sparked by the police murder of George Floyd last summer.

Jones picked up Northam’s endorsement, but many other establishment Democratic figures, including two of the state’s most powerful Black lawmakers, have endorsed Herring.

The winner of the primary contest will face GOP nominee Jason Miyares, a former prosecutor and a member of the House of Delegates who so far has been campaigning with a focus on public safety.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

Six Democrats are hoping for a chance to serve as lieutenant governor, a mostly ceremonial job that pays about $36,000 a year but is often a steppingstone to higher office.

Sam Rasoul, who has represented Roanoke in the House of Delegates since 2014, has a fundraising lead and is seen in some corners as the frontrunner. Most of the Democratic establishment, though, has coalesced around two-term Del. Hala Ayala, who represents Prince William County.

Also running are: northern Virginia attorney and racial justice activist Sean Perryman; Norfolk City Council member Andria McClellan; businessman Xavier Warren; and Del. Mark Levine, who is simultaneously running for his House seat.

The winner will face GOP nominee and former Del. Winsome Sears, who 20 years ago became the first Black Republican woman elected to the Virginia General Assembly.

Sears, who came to the U.S. from Jamaica as a child and served in the Marines, served a single term representing parts of Hampton Roads in the House.

HOUSE OF DELEGATES

Voters will choose nominees in dozens of House primaries, settling the field of candidates for a fall general election shaping up to be intensely contested. Democrats will be on defense in November, attempting to hang on to their majority.

In the primary, Democrats have an unusually high number of intra-party challengers — 14 — while only three Republicans incumbents have opponents.

Both parties say they are confident their incumbents will do well.

(All contents © copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved)

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