Torqued?

Tool time Tuesday.  I was a bit torqued over the weekend.  I tried to get the rear wheels off my wife’s Jeep to check the brakes and adjust the emergency brake.  I tried my brand new impact wrench, but the lug nuts wouldn’t budge.  I tried my 4 way lug wrench and I couldn’t make them move.  I added a cheater bar to the 4 way, in other words I used a pipe to extend one arm of the 4 way for better leverage.  I managed to break two lugs loose, but the other three would not move.  Are you supposed to see stars when you’re changing a tire?  Asking for a friend.  I was about to borrow my neighbors three foot breaker bar when the drops started to fall, chasing me inside.  You know the torque on lug nuts, depending on the size, is between 70 and 90 foot pounds, more for larger wheels.  The ones I was working with must be torqued to “pop a blood vessel.” Listen to the podcast here; https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Torqued?
/

Get a grip!

Tool time Tuesday.  They grip, they grab, they pinch and they twist.  We’re talking, of course, about the Vice Grip.  According the Living History Farm dot com, The first locking pliers, with the trade name Vise-Grip, were invented by William S. Petersen in De Witt, Nebraska, in 1924.  Petersen was a farmer and blacksmith. He was no stranger to invention, at one point he even tried to make and sell a motorcar. While working in his shop he realized that some of his tasks would be easier if he had a pair of pliers that would lock in place, like his vice.  He figured out that a screw mechanism in the handle could adjust the opening of the pliers. Later, he figured out a way for the other handle to lock it in place. He built several prototypes, first out of cardboard and then wood. Finally, he hammered one out of metal on his forge.  I have several sizes and shapes of Vice Grips in my tool collection.  I used a pair of needle nose vice grips over the weekend to stop a leaking fuel line on one of my tractors.   Listen to the podcast here; https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Get a grip!
/

A cool tool!

Tool time Tuesday and today we’re wrenching some stuff.  Over the weekend I helped my father in-law Larry work on his log splitter.  It was being a bit finicky the last time we used it.  Actually, it stopped working completely.  A bit of trouble shooting and we went about checking and cleaning a couple of filters.  One of those filters, the inlet filter to be exact, is threaded into the hydraulic fluid reservoir.  We used a pipe wrench to remove that filter.  When I say pipe wrench, most of you probably have a picture in your mind of what it looks like.  That design is actually called a Stillson-Pattern wrench, so named for the patent holder, Daniel C. Stillson.  Stillson received his patent in October of 1869.    In August of 1888, the Swedish inventor Johan Johansson improved on the design and receive a Swedish patent.  The pipe wrench is designed to loosen or tighten threaded pipe but is also handy with removing a hex nut that is rounded off.  The serrated teeth in the adjustable jaws dig into whatever your working with, giving you the grip you need to get the job done.  We got the job done using a ten inch pipe wrench.  Listen to the podcast here;    https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

A cool tool!
/

Tool time Tuesday; Thanks Dad!

Tool time Tuesday and today a “thank you” to my dad.  My dad, Walter, was born on this date in 1916.  When he passed away I inherited a lot of his tools, all of which I remember him using when I was growing up.  There’s a brace and bit hand drill that I’ve featured in other Fun Facts.  A wooded tool box, that he built, filled with various hand tools, parts to make pipe clamps, files of all shapes and sizes and all sorts of metal chisels and punches.  I also have a 100 foot tape measure that I remember holding for him on several occasions.  I always held the “dumb” end, but he would let me reel it in when we were through.  Most of his tools he had before I was born so, like me, they are antiques.  Their age doesn’t stop me from using them.  As a matter of fact their age, and the memories I have of them, are the very reason I use them.  Thanks dad.  Listen to the podcast here;   https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Tool time Tuesday; Thanks Dad!
/

Fun Fact March 22, 2022.

Tool time Tuesday and today we’re cleaning up the yard.  This past Saturday was a perfect day to start cleaning up the flowerbeds and the yard, which is exactly what happened at the Hill house.  One tool I used was a rake.  First mentioned in 1,100 BC China, rakes have changed a lot in the past centuries.  In 1874, a U.S. patent was given to a rake design that was something like a dustpan and metal broom combined.  Modern designs began to take hold around the 1920s, and since then there’s been a great deal of advancement in materials.  I used a leaf rake, but there are also garden rakes, shrub rakes, thatch rakes, leaf scoop rakes, hand, lake and roof rakes.  Why would you need more than a couple rakes hanging in your shed?  Well, according to Lawn smarter dot com, Having the right rakes in your arsenal not only makes for more beautiful yards and gardens, but it also makes the job more enjoyable.  No one wants to eat spaghetti with a shrimp fork.  Maybe it’s just me, but I’d try that shrimp fork thing if it meant I didn’t have to rake my yard.  Listen to the podcast here; https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Fun Fact March 22, 2022.
/

Fun Fact March 15, 2022.

Tool time Tuesday and today we’re getting hammered!  Well, actually we’re talking about the hammer.  Over the weekend I tried to get my vintage tractor started so I could plow my driveway.  Part of that process involved using a hammer to apply a “technical tap” to the tractor starter.  It didn’t work, by the way.  I ended up shoveling by hand.  The hammer, or at least things used to strike other things, goes back some three million years.  According the Langs dot Co dot UK, archeologists working in Kenya found a variety of stone tools, including one they concluded must have been used to strike and splinter other more brittle material, like flint, to break it into smaller pieces to make other tools like arrowheads and axes.  During the bronze age hammer heads were made of various metals, including bronze and eventually steel.  Drive a nail, pull a nail out, bend a piece of metal or try to persuade an old tractor starter to snap back to life.  The many uses of a hammer.  Listen to the podcast here;  https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Fun Fact March 15, 2022.
/

Fun Fact March 8, 2022.

Tool time Tuesday and today we’re splitting some firewood.  Over the weekend the family gathered at my in-laws house to split and stack some firewood.  My father in-law has a hydraulic splitter that makes the task a lot easier.  A five horsepower Briggs & Stratton engine spins a pump that creates pressure with hydraulic oil.  The pressurized oil is routed to a valve that the operator can push down to send the splitting wedge into and through a block of wood.  Push the handle up and the wedge moves up so you can reposition the block or put in the next to be split.  Even blocks with limbs and twisted grain are no match for the 27 ton force of the splitter.  Burning wood heats you up several times before you add it to your stove or fireplace.  Once when you gather it, once when you split it, once when you stack it and once when you fill your wood box.  Listen to the podcast here;    https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Fun Fact March 8, 2022.
/

Fun Fact March 1, 2022.

Tool time Tuesday and I’m going to pump you up.  I finally got my new tire for my tractor and was able to get it back together over the weekend.  One of the tools I used was an air compressor.  According to America Sullair dot com, in 1762 John Smeaton, the first professional engineer, designed a water wheel-driven blowing cylinder that slowly replaced the bellows. In 1776 John Wilkinson, an English inventor, introduced a more efficient blasting machine that could produce high amounts of air pressure.  This became an early prototype for all mechanical compressors. In 1829 the first compound air compressor, a device that compressed air in successive cylinders, was patented.  An early application of compressed air was the digging of the Mount Cenis Tunnel in the Swiss Alps. The tunnel began with workers drilling by hand, clearing 9 inches a day. But in 1862, four years after the project began, compressed air was introduced to the compressed-air drills, and the project was then completed in just 14 years, twice as fast as expected.  I just used my air compressor to pump up a tractor tire.  Listen to the podcast here; https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Fun Fact March 1, 2022.
/

Fun Fact February 22, 2022.

Tool time Tuesday and today we’re wearing a skirt.  Well, actually, we’re not wearing a skirt, but there is a link to a skirt in today’s tool.  Follow along.  According the BFY dot org, in the early 1800’s many women wore hoop skirts, giant skirts with flat metal fashioned into a circles to create the hoops.  As hoop skirts fell out of fashion and production slowed, British metalworker James Chesterman came up with a use for the flat metal used to construct the skirts. In 1829, Chesterman patented a spring tape measure that used flat metal with marked measurements. The metal was cased inside of a donut-shaped leather case that made the tool easy to transport and use.  Chesterman began to sell the product for $17 in the United States.  Sounds cheap today, but in 1829 that was the equivalent of about $300.  Alvin Fellows got an updated patent in 1868, adding the locking feature.  Still, it wasn’t until the 1940’s that the price and convenience of this new device slowly replace the wooden folding carpenters rule.  I have several different length and sizes of tape measures in my collection, from 3 to 25 feet and most of the time I can find one when I need it.  Listen to the podcast here; https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Fun Fact February 22, 2022.
/

Fun Fact February 8, 2022.

Tool time Tuesday and today we’re stripping!  Calm down, we’re stripping wires.  Over the weekend I installed a new, GFCI outlet in our kitchen island.  One of the tools I used was a pair of wire strippers.  They resemble a pair of pliers or scissors.  Although their primary purpose is to remove the insulation from the end of a wire, they actually can do several other jobs.  You can use the tip to grab and twist wires together before adding a wire nut.  Most have a space used to cut wire to length, a hole to shear off small bolts, crimpers to crimp connections, like a ground sleeve and a loop hole to make a hook or loop in the end of a wire to wrap around a screw terminal.  I have several pairs of strippers, all about the same.  I also use them to strip old copper wire for recycling.  Maybe someday I’ll upgrade to a pair that automatically adjust to the wire size and remove exactly the right amount of insulation with one, easy squeeze of the handle.  For now, I’ll just use what I have, they work fairly well, at least for what I need them for.  Listen to the podcast here; https://theriver953.com/lonnies-fun-fact/

Fun Fact February 8, 2022.
/