Youngkin announces $90 million in funding to launch “Virginia Research Triangle”

Governor Glenn Youngkin announced that Virginia will invest $90 million to launch the “Virginia Research Triangle.”

The one time funding will be split between the University of Virginia’s Manning Institute for Biotechnology, Virginia Tech’s Fralin Biomedical Research Institute, and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Medicines for All Institute.

The colleges will work together through the Virginia Innovation Partnership Authority to collaborate on commercialization and startup support.

The Authority will bring the colleges together to sign a memorandum of understanding between the parties.

Once this is completed, the funds will be dispersed with $50 million to UVA, $27 million to VT, and $13 million for VCU.

Governor Youngkin said, “Through this state commitment and private philanthropy, we are building Virginia’s research triangle and network, supporting our higher education institutions’ research endeavors, and expanding Virginia’s university research capacity that will enhance life-saving research development for generations to come.”

To view the full announcement, click here.

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Virginia colleges reevaluate legacy admissions

Following the recent Supreme Court decision on affirmative action, colleges and universities in Virginia are reevaluating their policies on legacy admissions.

Virginia Tech became the second public institution in the country to announce they will no longer consider relationships to alumni as a deciding factor.

The University of Virginia is adjusting their application to allow prospective students the opportunity to write about their personal or historic connection to the school instead of simply checking a box regarding their relation to alumni.

Some institutions, like VCU, never took legacy into consideration.

Attorney General Jason Miyares recently pleaded to all state colleges to do away with legacy admissions, urging them to focus on the individual and their experiences.

Colorado became first state to ban legacy admissions at public universities in May of 2021.

For more news from across the Shenandoah Valley, click here.

Luray conducts Downtown Revitalization Survey

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The Town of Luray is conducting a Downtown Revitalization Survey to help the town gain an understanding of what residents are looking for in the area.

The anonymous survey will look at the Historic District which includes Main, Court, and Broad Streets.

Luray native and VCU Master’s student Trinity Waldron is conducting the survey.

Her results will be released in a report that will be used to guide future business development.

A link to the survey can be found here and takes about five minutes to complete.

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Page County and others benefit from ABC grants

page county election coverage

A news release from the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Authority announced grant recipients for 2022-23.

Ten Community Organizations across the state were awarded grants from the Virginia ABC  Authority education and prevention grant  program.

The grants support programs that educate and strive to prevent or reduce underage and high risk drinking.

Some of the organizations that will share over $83,000 in grant money includes Page Alliance for Community Action receiving $9,000 to launch weekly seminars at Luray and Page County High Schools to educate youth about the harmful effects of alcohol and other substances through seminars and zooms on the subject.

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) will receive almost $10,000 to fund a series of alcohol free recreation and health themed events.

Almost $3,000  has been granted to assist Radford University students who wish to remain alcohol free hold free events.

James Madison University will receive almost $8,000 to help prevent incidents involving over indulgent house parties on campus.

Several other groups across the state have received a portion of the funds in efforts to prevent alcohol related incidents of alcohol abuse.

To find out more about these grant programs click here.

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Youngkin asks colleges to flatten tuition

Ten Commonwealth colleges have answered Governor Glenn Youngkin’s request to flatten tuition costs this fall.

This effort attempts to help students, parents, and families impacted by inflation.

So far, Virginia Commonwealth University, James Madison University and a few others have frozen their rates.

Some schools like Virginia Tech and the College of William and Mary were not planning a tuition increase this fall.

The University of Virginia is the lone institution that refused the request citing a potential loss of $7.5 million to which Youngkin pointed out the school’s $2 billion budget.

Some schools are already planning to raise fees and cost of room and board next year.

Another plan includes a one time scholarship for in-state students to cover increases for next year while out-of-state and graduate students will pay an increased rate.

For more news from across the Shenandoah Valley, click here.