The VDF is asking that you report the Spotted Lanternfly

water testing

The Virginia Department of Forestry (VDF) is asking that you report the Spotted Lanternfly.

The VDF confirms the pest  has now been found in 11 counties and two cities in Virginia including Winchester.

The insect  poses a serious threat to grape, peach, hops and hardwood trees along with other crops.

In July you will likely see the Late Nymph phase of the insects life cycle.

At that stage the insect develops red patches and white spots click here for visual.

The Virginia Department of Forestry is asking that if you see this invasive pests to report it here.

You can also report it to the Virginia Cooperative Extension office in your area so the insects spread can be tracked.

For more news from across the Shenandoah Valley, click here.

 

VDF reminds citizens spring fire season is about to begin

The Virginia Department of  Forestry (VDF) reminds citizens that spring fire season begins Feb. 15.

Virginia law prohibits any outdoor burning before 4 p.m. each day from Feb. 15 through April. 30.

After 4 p.m. winds generally decrease and moisture in the air increases however before burning you should check the forecast.

Stay at least 300 feet away from woodland, brush or fields with dry grass or flammable materials.

Any fire after 4 p.m. needs to be tended to at all times and not added to after midnight.

Call your local fire station to inform them that you are burning.

Call 911 as soon as the fire gets out of control if that should happen.

Violations of the burn law could mean being charged with a class 3 misdemeanor and a possible $500 fine.

For more news from across the Shenandoah Valley, click here.

Luray takes advantage of VDF initiatives

light up luray

Luray participated in three Virginia Department of Forestry initiatives this spring to help enhance the riparian buffer along Hawksbill Creek.

The Virginia Trees for Clean Water Grant was used to install trees along Hawksbill greenway.

The Emerald Ash Borer Removal and Replacement Cost-Share Program allowed for the removal and replacement of trees in the area.

The Mountains to Bay Program focused on erosion control and the streamside buffer.

Hawksbill Creek’s riparian buffer is crucial for filtering pollutants, reducing solar radiation, and erosion.

For more news from across the Shenandoah Valley, click here.